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Identity-centric zero trust: A sneak peek into tomorrow’s cyber fortress

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TLDR:

  • The focus in cyber security has shifted from fortifying network perimeters to identity and user authentication due to the rise of threat actors using legitimate credentials.
  • Identity-centric zero trust is an approach gaining prominence, where user identity becomes the new perimeter and strict controls and continuous authentication mechanisms are employed.
  • Implementing advanced authentication methods, integrating multi-factor authentication protocols, and implementing policy-based access control are key elements of identity-centric zero trust.
  • Identity threat detection and response aims to reduce the time it takes to identify and respond to threats by combining information from all identity sources.
  • The traditional network perimeter becomes obsolete in a cloud-based and remote work environment, and identity-centric zero trust represents the future of cyber security.

In the fluid cyber security landscape, the focus has shifted from fortifying network perimeters to acknowledging the critical role of identity and user authentication. Threat actors no longer exploit vulnerabilities, they log in using legitimate credentials. This paradigm shift calls for innovative security approaches. One approach gaining prominence is identity-centric zero trust.

Identity-centric zero trust builds on zero trust principles, making user identity the new perimeter. Strict controls and continuous authentication mechanisms ensure that only authorised entities gain access to sensitive resources. Implementing advanced authentication methods that analyse user behaviour to detect anomalies is a key element of identity-centric zero trust. Multi-factor authentication (MFA) protocols, focusing on passwordless and phishing-resistant methods, are also integrated into the approach.

Another important element of identity-centric zero trust is policy-based access control. Implementing granular access control policies that adapt based on contextual factors such as user location, device health, compliance, and time of access is crucial. Additionally, identity threat detection and response (ITDR) aims to reduce the time it takes to identify and respond to threats by combining information from all identity sources. Automated attack disruption stops identity attacks and lateral movement activities using compromised credentials, delivering consistent protection for human and non-human identities.

As organisations embrace cloud-based services, remote work, and diverse devices, the traditional network perimeter becomes obsolete. Identity-centric zero trust, fortified by zero trust architecture, represents the future of cyber security. By placing identity at the forefront, organisations can adapt to the dynamic nature of modern business environments, proactively protecting assets and maintaining data integrity.

In a digital landscape characterised by complexity and rapid evolution, identity-centric zero trust stands as a beacon guiding organisations towards a secure and adaptive future.


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